Skip to main content

Filipinos Very Own Jeepney is in Manila and Everywhere in the Philippines

Jeepney symbolizes the culture of the Philippines. This is the primary means of transportation of the Filipino people. This vehicle can be seen anywhere in the country. There is no city, town or barangay that has no jeepneys to represent them. Jeepney is the life of the people in the Philippines.

On the Photo: Jeepney Blessing Ceremony

Children and adults in this photo are excited about the blessing of this new jeepney. Coins were thrown on top of the jeepney and they scrambled for it. For the jeepney owner, this is the start of a new day, a new business venture. Jeepney like this one, which has a stainless body costs around P300,000 to Php400,000 and is mainly used as a passenger utility vehicle.


How many jeepneys can you see here?



How about here?


Riding a Jeepney - How it Feels to be in It
Riding on the jeepney might not be that comfortable and convenient to all. If you are tall, you have no other choice but to bend your neck a little. If you are fat, worst case that the driver will charge you of double pay. The jeepney operates as an all-terrain vehicle. Rough road, rocky road, flat road, zigzag, inclined, floody; name it and the jeepney would not back-out on traversing these terrains.

On the Photos: Different Style of Jeepneys





These jeepneys above are designed to travel on mountainous areas in the Philippines. They have the top loads for carrying vegetables harvested from the agricultural lands in the province of Benguet. Powered by powerful diesel engines, jeepeneys like these can carry up to about 2 tons.

On the Photo: Jeepney with Signages of its Travel Routes in Manila


In the city of Manila alone, jeepneys can be considered as one of the most exploited, aside from the mostly used vehicles. Sometimes, jeepneys are loaded with passengers and stuffs that are heavier that its weight capacity limit. If drivers have no worries, so are the passengers. As long as there is a remaining space where you can place your self and your things, then go ahead. As the jeepney is a modified version of the American military jeep, it has no fear to over take any cars or trucks on the roads and highways. Oftentimes, this is known to be as the "Hari ng Kalsada" or "King of the Road". There could have been over a million jeepneys in the Philippines today.

On The Photo: Lots of Jeepneys in Streets of Manila


The Cost of Riding a Jeepney
The fare on the jeepney is based on the approved minimum fare of the government. That is a minimum fare, currently at eight pesos, for the first three kilometers and an additional one peso for each succeeding kilometer (this could have changed now). This policy is being implemented in the entire country. However, most commuters and passengers are endlessly complaining about this high fare on every ride. For many, the minimum fare is not fair as this is taking a big portion of the Filipino's daily cost of living allowance (COLA).


On the Photo: Jeepney Passing by a Shell Station
 
Almost all jeepneys are running on diesel. For the average commuters and drivers, they are becoming powerless during oil price hikes. Jeepney operators and drivers are protesting on the streets of Manila during these times. Federation of Jeepney Operators and Drivers Associations of the Philippines or FEDJODAP is one of the most popular jeepney associations in the country while there seems to be associations in every town or city. This is becoming a normal situation when oil is putting their lives at risk.

On the Photo: Google Search Results on Jeepney


The Unique Design
Jeepneys' designs, styles and features have greatly evolved in the past decades. In the local terms, they call it "kolorete" - the thing that gives too much of a style for a jeepney making it very attractive not even to the local people but also to the foreigners. Google the jeepney and you can see a lot of pictures some of which are really amazing and unique.

Sarao Motors was the first to manufacture jeepneys in the Philippines during the 1950s. Today, jeepney manufacturers can be found in many places in the country including LGS Motors in Rizal and Malagueno Motors in Laguna. Innovation in jeepney designs has been laregely observed during the 1990s when these manufacturers began to incorporate Western design concepts such as those found in race cars and trucks. Each jeep then has its name plate placed in the front above the windshield. Mud guards were added. Decals, stickers, halogen lights, flashing lights, stainless body, and sturdy bumpers - these are what made up a jeepney these days.

Issues with Jeepneys
Jeepeneys could have been one of the major blocks in promoting a green world. As of today, the jeepney's smoke is really a huge contributing factor to the pollution in the environment, in Manila in particular. However, government agencies are still doing the right controls and measures over this pollution issue blamed against the jeepneys. But it seems not effective in the last three to four decades already as pollution is getting worst each year.

On the other hand, so-called "eJeepney" or "eJeep" are starting to arrive in the Philippines. In fact, some cities in Metro Manila have granted franchise to eJeepney drivers and operators. What is sure is that we will see a lot of eJeepney soon to travel on Philippine roads.

On the Photo: More Jeepney in the Philippines

Jeepney is like any other luxury car out there, a road user. Somehow it resembles the real traits of the Filipinos, be it good or bad. But as life goes on, jeepneys will still be there ready to serve anyone who wants to reach a destination at a lesser cost and at a faster speed. Want to ride or drive a jeepney? Go to the Philippines!


Related Posts

What’s Wrong with Us Filipinos? A Sensible Evaluation of Philippine Street Markets, Public Utility Vehicles, and Public Places


Cool Things You Need to Know (and Experience Now) About the Philippines – Part 2

About this Post
Amazed with this Philippines type of vehicle - the jeepney? Learn more about Philippines from this blogsite. Noriel Panganiban, the author, wants to share his personal views and experience about his country - the Philippines. This idea is coupled with his mission to bring positive changes to the country - by sharing blogs like this. You too can also contribute to these changes on your own ways.

For more information about Noriel and his goals, you can visit his website at www.knowriel.com. Contact Noriel at norielpanganiban@gmail.com if you have questions.

Most-Read Posts of the Month

“I Love Baguio City” - My Travel Story in the Summer Capital of the Philippines

The Strawberry Farm, Burnham Park, Mines View Park, the Mansion, Wright Park, Lourdes Grotto, and Session Road; these are among of the popular landmarks in the more commonly known “Summer Capital of the Philippines” – Baguio City. Why so? Well, the temperature here seldom exceeds 26 degree centigrade. During the cold season of December to February, the temperature falls down to even below 10 degree centigrade. The record low temperature was 6.3 degree and that was on January 18, 1961.

How to Travel to Baguio City?
Going to this cold city in the mountainous province of Benguet, Philippines is a six to seven hours travel by passenger utility bus from Manila. Starting from EDSA, traversing the NLEX, entering SCTEX, exiting the province of Tarlac and going through the neighbouring provinces of Pangasinan and La Union, and then exploring the zigzag road of either the Marcos Highway, the Kennon Road or the Naguilian Road, the coldest place in the Philippines will be reached. Baguio is about 2…

"Business as Usual" as the Filipinos Define It (Vulcanizing Shop, Sari-Sari Store, Bakery) – Part 1

I asked the shop owner about these old unused tires on what are they doing with it. The Vulcanizing shop owners says, “Oh, someone will pick up those tires and pay us 5 or 10 pesos each. Sometimes they just take it for free”.


Vulcanizing Shop - A Classic Example of Filipino Business
You’ve most probably seen and been into a local, typical vulcanizing shop like this one in the photo. The business concept is very simple. Here’s a customer with his flat or deflated tire and the vulcanizing boy will repair it using a rubber compound patch, a heating tool, and an air pump. If it’s a regular car or van tire, repairing one may only take 10 minutes the cost of which is around 30 to 60 pesos. If it’s a tire from a truck or bus, it could be around 30 minutes and the repair would cost the vehicle owner around 100 to 150 pesos.

Here’s the thing. A shop like this one could potentially earn a revenue of 1000 up to 2000 per day just by repairing a flat tire. Why? Well, with thousands of vehicles like j…

Who are These OFWs (Overseas Filipino Workers) and Why are They the Modern Heroes of the Philippines

At the turn of the millennium, the Philippine government launches this campaign program calling the overseas Filipino workers or OFWs as “Mga Bagong Bayani ng Bayan” (Modern Heroes of the Nation). From then onwards, different organizations established programs giving awards and recognitions to selected OFWs who did a remarkable contribution or action to their family, friends, work or in general, to the country.


OFW ka ba?Bakit?Eh kasi dating mo pa lang, mayaman ka na. Boom! 
(Are you an OFW? Why? Because with just the way look, it seems that you’re rich. Boom!)

My Cousin Dado as an OFW in South Korea 

At present, OFWs around the world are estimated to be around 12 – 14 million. This is approximately 10 – 12 percent of the Philippines total population. These OFWs are distributed on many countries all over the globe majority of whom are in Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Japan, Singapore, Hongkong, Taiwan, South Korea, and Italy. Immigrant workers in the United States, Australia and Eu…

What We Filipinos Believe In

Weeks before I arrive on writing this post, I came across this person popularly known as “The Son of Hamas”. Hamas is an Islamist Group in the Middle East. Many regards them as terrorists but on their own rights and beliefs, they exists to liberate Palestine, including modern-day Israel, from Israeli occupation. Before he’s a leader of Hamas. He quitted and now he’s into writing and public speaking taking his personal stand against the extremism done by his former organization Hamas and his campaign for better peace in the region in light of political correctness. You can search about him online - Mosab Hassan Yousef. Hamas’ beliefs, in Mosab’s point of view, is wrong.
The connection I want to imply in this piece of writing is this:

A belief, once it has been engraved in the people’s mind, is difficult to change, that it sometimes takes force (and time) for someone in authority to change it.



In the Filipino people’s mind, for example, that belief that Catholicism is the religion that wou…

“Fixer” in Philippine Government Agencies Like the Social Security System (SSS) and Land Transportation Office (LTO) – What We Filipinos Can Do About it?

Maybe in this post, I can clearly explain how “fixing” works in many government offices in the country. The idea is first, to warn you that such illegal fixing happens, and second, to give you tips on how you should avoid them. Plain and simple, we will not in anyway damage or speak against anyone or any particular office of the government in this post. It just happened that this is about my experience with LTO and SSS Tagaytay. I want to emphasize that still many government employees in the Philippines are doing their jobs right - including those who are working in the said branches.
If you have experienced transacting with any government offices here in the Philippines, whether you're a Filipino or not, you should already be familiar with these signages.



Here’s a bit of knowledge for you to digest first.
What is “fixing” or who is a “fixer” by the way?
In the Philippines, these good words happened to have a negative connotation over the past decades. Good words? Yes, indeed. When …

The Divisoria Malls - Defining Shopping in the Philippines

They call it the 168 Mall. It is one of the busiest places in the Philippines during shopping days like Christmas season when longing for enjoyment and relaxation is on the air once again. From Cavite, my home place, going to Divisoria, it will take you about an hour travel under normal traffic flow.

What is in this place? Well, Divisoria is the Bargain Shopping Capital of the Philippines. This is where wholesale and retail prices make shoppers say “WOW!” on delight. Visiting this place will definitely give you a realization about shopping on a different dimension. Find out why on the next paragraphs.

On the Photo: The Popular 168 Mall in Divisoria, Manila, Philippines


Divisoria is located in Binondo, Manila. It is accessible via Quiapo(where the famous Black Nazarene of Quiapo Church is) thru Recto Avenue and via Lawton near Manila City Hall. Divisoria has been there since the early 90’s. As it is near the North Harbour, Manila’s main seaport, the freshest and cheapest products usuall…

I know a man - Manny Pacquiao; He’s a Filipino

Way back 2006, I would not forget that day, Pacquiao knocked down Erik Morales twice and defeated the latter via TKO in the tenth round of that heated boxing match. I am with my friends in our rented apartment, which is near the company I used to work, watching the brawl in both excitement and suspense. That was yet another history made, taking his revenge to a Mexican boxer who once stole the glory from a Filipino champion. Like any other Filipino, I shouted, cheered, and celebrated that very moment of winning. The afternoon news is all about that big story of Manny Pacquiao - hailed as the People’s Champ. That was the year I started to get more fascinated about Pacquiao.



“All those who are around me are the bridge to my success, so they are all important.” – Manny Pacquiao


The Pambansang Kamao
Manny Pacquiao is dubbed as the “Pambansang Kamao” (National Fist). I am not going to tell his story as a boxer as that story has been there online for quite some time. What I want to share in th…

Filipinos! Here is My Free Education Advocacy that I Want You to Know

In the Philippines, we often hear this statement from the Filipinos about education:


“Hindi hadlang ang kahirapan para makatapos ng pag-aaral.” Poverty is not a hindrance to finish education.
I completely disagree! Allow me to explain my side.





Millions of Filipinos are unable to step highschool and even college because of the hardships in life we have in our country. Many are poor and therefore cannot afford the cost of education in the Philippines. If paying 5,000 to 20,000 pesos per semester in a Philippine college is already tough, then how about more the daily baon, school projects, transportation allowance, boarding house, and extra expenses?


Wake up! This is the truth. That Filipino statement with all respect, if I were you, forget it. Accept the fact that you cannot just earn your education in the Philippines because you are poor.

This is not an insult to anyone. I am from a poor family but I was able to complete a college degree despite of that. If you really want to find a solution…

Decoding the Meaning Behind the Creative Photos of a Filipino Local Traveler

Meet Jerob, a Filipino traveler who truly enjoys the place he used to visit here in the Philippines – with creativity in mind. Jerob was a former workmate of mine and I got really fascinated with the photos he’s sharing on his social media page. There is something different in there, something even beyond creativity. I did not interview Jerob about his photos except that I only asked his permission that I will create a blog post related to some of them. Great! He allowed me. So in this post, let me try to decode the meaning behind each one of Jerob’s impressive photos.

In this photo, obviously, he’s into “planking” and interestingly, he did it on top of the “I love ABRA” signage. Well, planking became famous here in the Philippines just a few years back. It is actually an exercise and at the same time a self-test for mental toughness. That idea if you can endure to hold your position for a long time and to also do it in a public place is a form of creative communication. Yes, it is gr…

“Pasalubong” – What Makes this Filipino Word Very Special?

Probably next to the beauty of a tourism spot, if it’s about the real reasons for traveling there, is our search for the best “pasalubong”. It’s the tagalog word for “gift” or “souvenir” and it can be anything from foods, toys, clothes, handicraft, furniture, soaps, wearables, or household items. It’s practically anything, big or small, cheap or expensive, edible or not. And for as long as that special item was bought somewhere else and then given to someone as an act of love and kindness – the true purpose has been served.


A simple gesture of “Salamat po” (Thank you) for sharing that pasalubong is enough to make you feel the love and kindness back. There is the best pasalubong for kids, for grandmas and grandpas, for a favorite grandson, for a close neighbor or friend, for the workmates, for the boss, for a former enemy, for a religious brother, and even for a complete stranger. Yes, indeed!

Well, “pasalubong” is actually different from a gift for birthday, wedding, or special gatherin…