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Filipino Job Seekers: Here are the Practical Tips on How to Get a (Good) Job in the Philippines – Part 3

Hello Filipino job seekers! Today, you are about to read Part 3 of the practical tips on how to get a job within and outside the Philippines. I know, we all want a good job, a job that will give us the satisfaction we deserve and the financial freedom we aim for. Before I lay down the last list of tips (which more likely is the most important tips of all in these post series), let’s have a quick re-cap of Part 1 and Part 2.


In Part 1, I give you tips on how to write a good resume, how to get yourself ready for the interview, and how to find and apply for a job that fits your personality or profession. Also, I offer some advises that will help you put that budget for your job application into a good spend. Using the internet smartly, getting a temporary job while applying for the big one, and seeking the help of people around you are some of those important to-do’s when applying for jobs.

In Part 2, I list down all the requirements of your future Philippine employer which mainly includes the clearances, government-mandated documents, and school documents. Of course, the resume is an important document you should always have a fresh copy of in your file case. Also, for aspirant OFWs, there is a link I shared that would help you best on your overseas job applications. First-timer, old-timer, and work-abroad job seekers must be ready with all these requirements in order to have a smooth and speedy job application process.

How I wish all those practical tips has already helped you in certain ways. You can always go back to them whenever you feel the need.

Now, let’s get into the bottom of this. Job seeking, job hunting, job application, job searching; whatever you want to call it, there are sure and proven ways on how to secure one. You better pay attention to each of these seven (7) tips for you may not hear this from anyone else. I want to help you so here they are.

1. Use your education to the fullest.


What for is you two, three, four or five years stay in college if you will not apply what you’ve learned in getting that job? You studied your craft, you invested money every semester, and you promised yourself (and maybe your parents too) that you will help yourself and your family back when you graduated. And now, all those hardwork and sacrifices comes to an end. You got your diploma, what else are you waiting for? Go and face the reality of life – get a job.

The most important thing to keep in mind is to always put into use what you’ve learned. Craft your resume right, review for qualifying exams, get ready for the interview, and prove to them you know how to help their business in earning profits. If you finish engineering, solve their math problems. If you finish law, give them a sound legal advise. If you earned a 2-year diploma in automotive, let them know you can fix their broken car. Let them know that you know how to help them grow their company, with your education.

2. Value your time.

Time is gold. The best time to do it is now. There is no other time but today. You wouldn’t get hired into that job if you wouldn’t look for it and act on it. Jobs won’t approach you unless you show sign of interest. When I was looking for job years ago, I always come up with a plan. If this recruiter would call me this week, I should be ready with everything, including the filing of vacation leave in my current company. If I need to get a job three months from now, I should be applying starting today.

Well, honestly, most of my planning didn’t work. However, what I learned is that you can manage your time in between job application and job resignation. Old time job seekers know it. There is a right time to send those resumes. There is a perfect time to look for a greener pasture.

Value your time when it comes to finding jobs. It really matters I’m telling you.

3. Broaden your connection.


These words of advise may no longer be be new to you: “Kaya naman natanggap sa trabaho yan dahil may kakilala sa loob” (The reason why he got hired because he knows someone working inside the company). Frankly speaking, there is nothing wrong at all with that. That is how the job hunting process works even in the old times. Your father works in the company, your father is you backer or helper to get you hired in the same company. Today, it’s still the same approach. When you know someone who’s working in the company you want to work for, grab the opportunity to ask him or her for assistance.

Ask the person if he can pass your resume to the HR department. Go one level higher, ask the person to pass your resume to the hiring manager. If you know the CEO because you’ve once have had a business transaction with her, go ahead and send your application direct to her. Connections or networks are what you need these days. It’s a norm to seek favor or help. It is ethical to do that. What’s wrong is when you bribe the recruitment officers or hiring managers just to get that job you aim for. Worst case is when you threaten someone just be included in the list of hired candidates. You get what I mean?

4. Finance your job application wisely.


Yes, this a very practical tip you should never ever forget. I’ve mentioned this a bit in Part 1 but let me get one step higher with my advise. The shortest possible amount of time to invest or spend in a single job application if it’s here in the Philippines is three (3) days (not consecutive). Lucky you are if you get hired on-the-spot and asked to work the next day. Well, it happens, mostly on job fairs. But the usual is first day would be the preliminary interview. Second day would be the second or third (and last if you’re again lucky) interview. And the third day would be the completion and submission of all the requirements. The process can even take up to ten (10) days or more. All of the preparations, travel, food, communication, and clothing requires budget and you have to be ready with that.

Imagine applying for an overseas job. You will have to go to the recruitment agency maybe for up to five times, then attend trainings, process requirements such as passport, medical exams, and POEA clearance, and then you will have to buy all the stuffs you need to travel abroad. OFWs certainly know how much money is needed to accomplish everything. Even for local jobs, you need to have sufficient funds to land on a job. Practically speaking, based on my experience, on the average you need 1000 pesos per day to get a good job in Metro Manila. That covers everything.

5. Study more.

Job recruiters are always seeking for smart answers to every interview question. Well, this is how the job hiring process exactly works today. Say you applied for a job via Jobstreet or Monster (online). Within a week or two, job recruiter will call you to schedule a preliminary job interview. Some conduct phone or online interviews by the way. Then if you pass the interview, they will bring up your application to the hiring manager for the final interview. In all of these 3 steps, you need to be prepared with what you are going to write or say.

When sending online job applications, other than your resume, you need to send a cover letter. Sometimes, you need to answer some questions before you can click the “Submit Application” button. Just right from there, you are already being scored or evaluated by the hiring company. Then in those series of interviews, you will be thrown with hard questions, challenging case scenarios to solve, and even intimidating IQ tests. “Why the manhole is round?”; things like that.

Remember, you need a good job. No employers will just spoon feed it to you. You need to study their business. You need to impress them with your analytical thinking and practical approach towards every question or every test problem. Study for it. Open the books. Browse the right websites. Google it right.

6. Put your feet into the business owner’s shoes.


Has anyone ever give you this advise? If yes, consider yourself lucky for you just got mentored by an authentic business-minded person and that’s great. There is a job for there is a business or a model similar to business in the case of non-profits and the government. They want you in for they want you to help them in their business needs, basically making it grow. The revenue model is always there and that is the main thing in the job economy. A business owner will say or think “I will have to create more jobs when my business starts to earn more revenue”. And to get that job, you will have to prove them or to the business owner logically that you can help him achieve his business goals –earn more revenue.

How to do it? Learn her business as far as you can. If you’re aiming for supervisory position, try to understand how the supply chain, service operation, sales process, and customer relationship systems work. If you want the managerial position, dive deeper into those value chain aspects. If you want to take the seat of the executives, you have to promise them a goal and that you can achieve it in a matter of time. Understand the business you want to see yourself working at. Think as if you own the business.

7. Dream big and aim high.

Promise yourself you will do everything to get that good job. You may not get it on the first attempt, even on the second and third (honestly, this was my case), but you will soon get it. There will be challenges along with your job searching endeavors. They will reject you. They will say they will call you but it will never happen. You will almost get until you hear the bad news, the position is closed. You are soon to fly abroad until a personal or family problem comes in. It has been five years since you lodge application for your working visa and still no luck with it. Challenges, circumstances not in favor of you, they will be there.

But if you dream big and act on it no matter what, there is no way you can’t get it. If you aim higher and not just be contented with that low-salary or rank-and-file position, you can be there. Remember, you’re a Filipino and you need a good job and you must be happy with it.

A Bonus Advise
On my case, I dreamed to get a good job. I worked as a part-time waiter during college days. I remember it was a stormy day when the owner interviewed me. Then after graduation, I got this first job as a technician. After 3 years, I aimed for a better one. Then I became an engineer. But then, I look after a more challenging job. So I applied here, applied there. Nothing happens not until about four years, I received this call from overseas. I became an OFW in Singapore. But then, I decided to quit and go back to the Philippines. I aim higher than becoming an OFW. Today, I am an HFW (Home-based Filipino Worker) earning enough, happy, and writing this blog to inspire you. This for me is what I can call a (good) job in the Philippines. And I believe there’s a still and always will be a better one.

Whether you’re a janitor or a CEO today, regardless of your age, you can still get a good job, even a business of your own (which I am excited to create another series of posts soon). Believe it and act on it. I just offer the practical tips and it is up to you to do it.



Related Posts
Filipino Job Seekers: Here are the Practical Tips on How to Get a (Good) Job in the Philippines – Part 1
Filipino Job Seekers: Here are the Practical Tips on How to Get a (Good) Job in the Philippines – Part 2


About this Post
Thank you for reading this post. If you please share this with your friends, classmates, family members, colleagues, or to anyone whom you know need a help or encouragement in finding a good job here in the Philippines. Let us help them get a (good) job in the Philippines. To find more interesting topics about getting a good job or improving your career, visit www.knowriel.com, an educational website offering free learning guides on business and career to students, professionals, employees, entrepreneurs, business owners, executives, investors, and everyone.

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